Now that Easter’s Over…

I saw an interesting post on a website I like to follow: everydayimpastoring.com. It’s a site where gifs, or short looping videos, are posted with a tag line to provide context. They make me giggle and laugh, so I visit the site at least once every couple days. One of the posts that was posted yesterday  has the tag-line “Easter Monday: When I hear someone say ‘Now that Easter’s over…'” and has a gif of Red Foreman, the dad from That 70’s Show sitting up rapidly with a scowl on his face. I can’t give it credit. Just go to the site.

I’ve got time.

I’m serious, go look at it.

Alright, funny no? It does touch on a problem that I have and that I see.

This was my first experience working a Holy Week, and it was also the first time that I had been to Church five days in a row. Now I know I have a little different context, but it really took it out of me. Having to be “on” that much takes it out of an introvert. But I enjoyed every part. It wasn’t that I was sick of church or the people there-in, it was just tiring. I never knew (shout outs to my grandparents and other ministers for doing the grind for years).

The problem was that after church on Sunday I was ready for a little bit of a break. I was ready for a “Post-Easter” nap. While I never did get that break, the sentiment behind it was faulty. Easter isn’t over. Easter isn’t a one day event where you get to dress up in nice pastel colors, have spiral ham with the family (the irony on celebrating a Jew being resurrected by eating ham is there), or a day to go have brunch if you’re a non-church going type. Easter is a season that is began by the celebration of the resurrection of Christ Jesus. This upcoming is the “Second Sunday in Easter.” It is a time where we celebrate that life-altering event. It is a 50 day season until the day of Pentecost.

My point is not to harp that we should all be liturgically correct or follow the liturgical season (although it has its positives), what I’m trying to say that the celebration of Easter is not limited to one Sunday a year. We do not have to limit our thanks for the resurrection. The resurrection isn’t confined to one day.

God overcame death through Jesus. That is something that can be celebrated for at least the next 47 (have you counted the last couple days?) days, and probably a little bit longer if you wanted to.

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